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The Little Rock Nine

Yikes! I am late on this review. I’ve been on the job hunt and I completely forgot about it.

The publisher’s blurb:

In 1957, Melba Beals was one of the nine African American students chosen to integrate Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas. But her story of overcoming didn’t start–or end–there. While her white schoolmates were planning their senior prom, Melba was facing the business end of a double-barreled shotgun, being threatened with lynching by rope-carrying tormentors, and learning how to outrun white supremacists who were ready to kill her rather than sit beside her in a classroom. Only her faith in God sustained her during her darkest days and helped her become a civil rights warrior, an NBC television news reporter, a magazine writer, a professor, a wife, and a mother.

In I Will Not Fear, Beals takes readers on an unforgettable journey through terror, oppression, and persecution, highlighting the kind of faith needed to survive in a world full of heartbreak and anger. She shows how the deep faith we develop during our most difficult moments is the kind of faith that can change our families, our communities, and even the world. Encouraging and inspiring, Beals’s story offers readers hope that faith is the solution to the pervasive hopelessness of our current culture.

What I thought of this book:

I think most people have heard Continue reading “The Little Rock Nine”

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Eating From The Ground Up!

Oooh, I love this book!

The publisher’s blurb:

Vegetables keep secrets, and to prepare them well, we need to know how to coax those secrets out.

“What is the best way to eat a radish?” Alana Chernila hears this sort of question all the time. Arugula, celeriac, kohlrabi, fennel, asparagus–whatever the vegetable may be, people always ask how to prepare it so that the produce really shines. Although there are countless ways to eat our vegetables, there are a few perfect ways to make each vegetable sing.
With more than 100 versatile recipes, Eating from the Ground Up teaches you how to showcase the unique flavor and texture of each vegetable, truly bringing out the best in every root and leaf. The answers lie in smart techniques and a light touch. Here are dishes so simple and quick that they feel more intuitive than following a typical recipe; soups for year-round that are packed with nourishment; ideas for maximizing summer produce; hearty fall and winter foods that are all about comfort; impressive dishes fit for a party; and tips like knowing there’s not one vegetable that doesn’t perk up with a sprinkle of salt. No matter the vegetable, the central lesson is: don’t mess with a good thing.

What I thought of the book:

I have really been wanting a cookbook that Continue reading “Eating From The Ground Up!”

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Beautiful Birds!

While not actually a book, I fell completely in love with these postcards as soon as I saw them!

The publisher’s blurb:

Birdwatchers everywhere will love this beautiful box of 50 postcards featuring original bird paintings by renowned ornithologist David Sibley. This brand new vertical format offers 50 postcards of birds lovingly rendered in watercolors by David Sibley and chosen with their individual beauty and prominence in the country in mind. Housed in an elegant keepsake box with tabs dividing them by type (sea birds, birds of prey, songbirds) for ease of choice, these postcards are ideal for mailing to friends and family, framed and used as décor, or attached to presents as unique gift tags.

What I thought of the collection:

Just gorgeous! Printed on Continue reading “Beautiful Birds!”

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Discovering Little Bits Of History

Just as I wrote for my review of Shadow of the Storm:

Every so often you come across a book that is so well-written you just want to savor it. Curl up on the divan and sip some coffee or tea, tune out the world, and immerse yourself in its story.

Again, this is so very true.

 

The publisher’s blurb:

“. . . must-reads for fans of Biblical and historical fiction.”–RT Book Reviews on the Out from Egypt series

Though Israel has found relative peace, Moriyah has yet to find her own. Attempting to avoid the scorn of her community, she’s spent the last seven years hiding behind the veil she wears. Underneath her covering, her face is branded with the mark of the Canaanite gods, a shameful reminder of her past captivity in Jericho and an assurance that no man will ever want to marry her.

When her father finds a widower who needs a mother for his two sons, her hopes rise. But when their introduction goes horribly wrong, Moriyah is forced to flee for her life. Seeking safety at one of the newly established Levitical cities of refuge, she is wildly unprepared for the dangers she will face and the enemies–and unexpected allies–she will encounter on her way.

What I thought of the book:

I’ve already enjoyed two of Connilyn Cossette’s novels: Shadow of the Storm and Wings of the Wind, both Continue reading “Discovering Little Bits Of History”

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Phoebe’s Light

I really like Suzanne Woods Fisher. Just sayin’.

The publisher’s blurb:

Phoebe Starbuck has always adjusted her sails and rudder to the whims of her father. Now, for the first time, she’s doing what she wants to do: marrying Captain Phineas Foulger and sailing far away from Nantucket. As she leaves on her grand adventure, her father gives her two gifts, both of which Phoebe sees little need for. The first is an old sheepskin journal from Great Mary, her highly revered great-grandmother. The other is a “minder” on the whaling ship in the form of cooper Matthew Macy, a man whom she loathes.

Soon Phoebe discovers that life at sea is no easier than life on land. Lonely, seasick, and disillusioned, she turns the pages of Great Mary’s journal and finds herself drawn into the life of this noble woman. To Phoebe’s shock, her great-grandmother has left a secret behind that carries repercussions for everyone aboard the ship, especially her husband the captain and her shadow the cooper. This story within a story catapults Phoebe into seeing her life in an entirely new way–just in time.

In this brand-new series, bestselling author Suzanne Woods Fisher brings her signature twists and turns to bear on a fascinating new faith community: the Quakers of colonial-era Nantucket Island.

What I thought of the book:

I absolutely loved the tandem storylines – one taking Continue reading “Phoebe’s Light”

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Warning: Sarcasm Ahead

Most of the books I review come from a few Christian publishing houses, for which I am grateful. I’ve discovered some great authors and read some enthralling stories thanks to their generosity in allowing bloggers with less than 100 followers (at the time) to sign on as reviewers. I also get to review books through Blogging For Books, which is part of Penguin Random House. Theirs is a decidedly wider, secular offering for blogging. This time, I couldn’t help it – I had to try this out:

The publisher’s blurb:

With a biting, satirical style reminiscent of The Onion, How to Be a Perfect Christian takes a humorous look at the quirks of cultural Christianity while subtly challenging the reader to search for more than a cultural faith.

Written in the trademark style of The Babylon Bee, this book humorously satirizes cultural Christianity while peppering in subtle challenges to the reader. Through humor and sarcasm (and a handy meter to rank your “holiness” as you progress through the book), readers will be called to find a more biblical understanding of the Christian faith, all while poking fun at the quirks of the modern, American Christian community.

What I thought of the book:

First thing’s first: If you take your church community or yourself too seriously, this may not be the book for you. However, if you enjoy sarcasm, good satire, Continue reading “Warning: Sarcasm Ahead”